Archives de Tag: Acemoglu

Les institutions sont-elles toujours efficientes ?

Un intéressant échange sur la question de l’efficience des institutions a eu lieu ces derniers jours entre Daron Acemoglu et James Robinson d’un côté, et Peter Leeson de l’autre, à partir notamment des travaux de Leeson sur les institutions de la piraterie au 18ème siècle (voir ici pour ma note de lecture sur l’ouvrage de Leeson). Le premier post de Acemoglu & Robinson est ici, la première réponse de Leeson est là, la réponse d’Acemoglu & Robinson est ici, et enfin la réponse à la réponse de Leeson est ici. Lire la suite

Publicités

6 Commentaires

Classé dans Non classé

Recherche en économie versus blogs d’économie

Daron Acemoglu et James Robinson, à propos des différences entre la recherche en économie et les blogs d’économie :

Another aspect is the divide between what the academic research in economics does — or is supposed to do — and the general commentary on economics in newspapers or in the blogosphere. When one writes a blog, a newspaper column or a general commentary on economic and policy matters, this often distills well-understood and broadly-accepted notions in economics and draws its implications for a particular topic. In original academic research (especially theoretical research), the point is not so much to apply already accepted notions in a slightly different context or draw their implications for recent policy debates, but to draw new parallels between apparently disparate topics or propositions, and potentially ask new questions in a way that changes some part of an academic debate. For this reason, simplified models that lead to “counterintuitive” (read unexpected) conclusions are particularly valuable; they sometimes make both the writer and the reader think about the problem in a total of different manner (of course the qualifier “sometimes” is important here; sometimes they just fall flat on their face). And because in this type of research the objective is not to construct a model that is faithful to reality but to develop ideas in the most transparent and simplest fashion; realism is not what we often strive for (this contrasts with other types of exercises, where one builds a model for quantitative exercise in which case capturing certain salient aspects of the problem at hand becomes particularly important). Though this is the bread and butter of academic economics, it is often missed by non-economists.

En ce jour de remise du Prix-Nobel-d’économie-qui-n’en-est pas-vraiment-un, il est intéressant de noter que Daron Acemoglu a une probabilité qui tend vers p = 1 de recevoir ce prix dans les 20 prochaines années (c’est une probabilité subjective, cela va de soi, mais c’est un prior largement partagé au sein de la communauté des économistes, et même au-delà).

6 Commentaires

Classé dans Non classé

Acemoglu sur les institutions en économie

Long mais très intéressant entretien avec Daron Acemoglu sur le site Edge. Acemoglu aborde le rôle des institutions dans le développement économique, ce qui est le sujet de son livre co-écrit avec James Robinson Why Nations Failet du blog du même nom.

2 Commentaires

Classé dans Non classé